The Nursing Program at MacMurray College is among the few professional training programs in Central Illinois providing baccalaureate nursing education at a college with a strong liberal arts tradition.

With more than 30 years of educating nurses, MacMurray is well-known and respected by area medical facilities. Small class sizes and diverse clinical experience all add to the unique MacMurray nursing experience.

MacMurray's program of study leading to a baccalaureate degree in nursing is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street, NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001, 202-887-6791. It is approved by the Illinois Department of Professional and Financial Regulation. Graduates of the program are prepared to take the national examination for licensure as a registered nurse (NCLEX-RN) and are prepared for ongoing graduate study for advanced nursing roles.

Clinical Experiences

As a nursing major at MacMurray, you'll have the opportunity for approximately 700 hours of clinical experience in scores of hospitals and community health-care agencies in Jacksonville, Springfield, and elsewhere in the region.

Hospitals providing experiences for MacMurray nursing students are Passavant Area Hospital in Jacksonville and Memorial Medical Center and St. John's Hospital in Springfield, or you could have experiences in a variety of community agencies, such as county health departments, home health-care agencies, nursing homes, community health clinics, and alcohol and substance abuse treatment centers.

The Barnum Randall Nursing Technology Center

The Nursing Technology Center, located in the Springer Center for Nursing on the MacMurray campus, has high- and medium-fidelity simulators that give you the opportunity to safely and securely practice the complex and unpredictable critical situations you will meet in your first nursing position.

Through the simulators and the one-on-one teaching of the MacMurray Nursing faculty, you'll receive immediate feedback and essential debriefing after each simulated patient encounter. Typically, you'll simulate such situations several times each semester, so you'll be ready for most situations that come your way at your practicum and as a licensed nurse.

After Graduation

Graduates are prepared to take the national examination for licensure (NCLEX-RN) to become licensed as registered nurses and to enter graduate study for advanced nursing roles.

Our recent graduates have gone into roles as staff nurses in acute care clinical settings, caring for patients in medical-surgical, pediatrics, intensive care, emergency, psychiatric, and maternal-child settings.

In recent years, almost all MacMurray Nursing graduates have found employment by the time they graduate at such places as Memorial Health Systems and St. John's Hospital, both in Springfield, IL; Passavant Area Hospital in Jacksonville, IL; Barnes Children's Hospital in St. Louis, and Saint Louis University Hospital.

Learn more about Nursing courses and how to pursue a degree in Nursing through our academic catalog.

NURS 205. Introduction to the Nursing Profession. (1) This course introduces students to their privileged roles as members of the nursing profession. Exploration of critical thinking and clinical judgment processes is used to promote self-awareness and facilitate nursing role development. The course incorporates assessment of learning styles as a means to facilitate learner outcomes. Students are exposed to the standards of the profession including its values, ethical principles, and legal responsibilities. Students examine the relationships between personal values and professional values, exploring their own assumptions and approaches to judging situations. No clinical. Prerequisite: admission to the Nursing Program and completion of at least 24 credit hours of nursing prerequisite courses and/or general education requirements, including BIOL 209 and CHEM 131.

NURS 210. Nursing Knowledge and Competencies I. (4) Introduces students to the fundamental nursing knowledge and competencies necessary to practice nursing. Competencies addressed will include fundamental aspects of caring, communication, the nursing process, and technical nursing skills. This course will integrate the knowledge of critical thinking, clinical judgment, and standards of the nursing profession (values, ethics, legal responsibilities) introduced in NURS 105. Lab course. Prerequisites: admission to the Nursing Program and completion of at least 24 credit hours of nursing prerequisite courses and/or general education requirements, including BIOL 209 and CHEM 131.

NURS 211. Nursing Knowledge and Competencies II. (5) This course continues to build on the knowledge and competencies learned in NURS 210, with increasing opportunities to transfer classroom knowledge to the clinical setting. Students learn the scientific principles underlying technical nursing skills which include medication administration, medical and surgical asepsis, wound care, cardiopulmonary interventions, gastrointestinal functioning, genitourinary functioning, pre- and post-operative care, and end-of-life care. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide the opportunity to apply the psychomotor aspects of these skills. Students function as providers of care in adult health care settings. Clinical course. Prerequisites: NURS 205 and 210.

NURS 214. Health Assessment. (3) Introduces student to the holistic assessment of an individual. In this course, students learn normal assessment findings expected for individuals across the lifespan. This provides a basis for recognizing findings that require additional assessment and monitoring. Students are introduced to physical and psychosocial assessment skills as well as the major influences of development, environment, culture, religion, socioeconomic status, and family. Emphasis is placed on the importance of assessment as the first step of the nursing process. Lab course. Prerequisites: NURS 205 and 210.

NURS 310. Pathophysiology and Pharmacology I. (3) Provides the core knowledge necessary to understand the physiological and pharmacological aspects of illness and disease. Addresses the scientific principles and rationales necessary to recognize the relationships between pathology, pharmacology, and nursing care. No clinical. Prerequisites: NURS 211 and 214 and all natural science requirements.

NURS 311. Pathophysiology and Pharmacology II. (3) Provides the core knowledge necessary to understand the physiological and pharmacological aspects of illness and disease. Addresses the scientific principles and rationales necessary to recognize the relationships between pathology, pharmacology, and nursing care. No clinical. Prerequisites: NURS 310 and 330.

NURS 330. Illness and Disease Management I. (6) Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to design and provide care for adults with illness and disease. Students focus on providing individualized, evidence-based nursing care directed toward achieving quality outcomes. Clinical experiences take place in acute care settings. Clinical course. Prerequisites: NURS 211 and 214 and all natural science requirements.

NURS 331. Illness and Disease Management II. (6) Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to design and provide nursing care for adults with complex illness and disease. Students focus on providing individualized, evidence-based nursing care directed toward achieving quality outcomes. Clinical experiences take place in rapidly changing acute-care settings. Students engage in reflection on their clinical reasoning skills and clinical judgments. Clinical course. Prerequisites: NURS 310 and 330.

NURS 401. Evidence-based Nursing Practice. (3) Emphasizes the utilization of current research findings as a means to improve nursing outcomes. Theoretical foundations of the research process are explored. Beginning skills are developed in critiquing nursing research and conducting research reviews. The use of information technology as a tool for finding and disseminating evidence for nursing practice is explored. No clinical. Prerequisites: senior standing, BUSA 367 or PSYC 221.

NURS 410. Vulnerable Populations I. (4) Emphasizes public health principles with childbearing/childrearing families and communities. Clinical experiences provide students with the opportunity to design, manage, and coordinate nursing care for families and vulnerable populations. Students will focus on using evidence-based nursing care to achieve health outcomes for populations. Clinical course. Prerequisites: senior standing and PSYC 242.

NURS 411. Vulnerable Populations II. (3) Focuses on the elderly population's self-management of common chronic illnesses and the associated goal of independent living. Students are required to reflect on their own beliefs regarding the elderly population, explore current evidence-based practice regarding self-management of chronic illness in the elderly, and develop a management plan for clients in an independent-living facility. Clinical experiences involve home visits to elderly clients living with chronic illnesses in the community. Clinical course. Prerequisite: senior standing.

NURS 415. Illness and Disease Management in Childbearing and Childrearing Families. (4) Focuses on core knowledge and core competencies necessary to coordinate and manage nursing care for pregnant women with complications and children experiencing illness and disease. Collaboration with others is emphasized to achieve quality outcomes. Clinical course. Prerequisite: senior standing.

NURS 418. Mental Illness and Disease Management. (5) This course focuses on illness and disease management for persons with mental health and psychiatric disorders. It is designed to provide a holistic perspective in the provision of care to individuals, families, and communities. Clinical experiences provide students with the opportunity to design, manage, and coordinate nursing care for individuals and families with mental health needs. Students will focus on using evidence-based nursing care to achieve health outcomes for clients. Clinical course. Prerequisite: senior standing.

NURS 432. Nursing Synthesis. (2) This course involves reflection on and synthesis of the student's learning achievements throughout their nursing education. Students reflect on achievement of the nursing program outcomes and synthesize their achievements using a portfolio. In addition, students engage in weekly NCLEX-RN review sessions in order to prepare for the NCLEX-RN. Prerequisite: senior standing.

NURS 450. Leadership and Professionalism in Nursing. (6) A wide variety of trends, concepts, and issues that are central to the profession of nursing are discussed. The transition from novice to competent professional nurse is addressed with emphasis on lifelong professional growth. Organizational, leadership, and management principles and theories are explored as students coordinate, delegate, and supervise care for teams of patients. Methods of evaluating the quality and effectiveness of nursing care are addressed. Three class hours and nine clinical hours per week. Prerequisite: senior standing.

Photo of Angela Pierson

Angela Pierson

Lead Faculty & Director of Nursing, Assistant Professor of Nursing

"I love teaching at MacMurray College because the faculty interactions with students and coworkers are positive and motivating."

  • Areas of interest: Pierson enjoys spending time with her family, baking, and traveling.
  • M.S.N./Ed. — Western Governors University
  • B.S.N. — MacMurray College
  • A.D.N. — Lincoln Land Community College
  • Courses taught: Pathophysiology and Pharmacology I and II
Photo of Karen Bade

Karen Bade

Assistant Professor of Nursing

"As I was completing my MSN, MacMurray gave me the opening to complete my final preceptorship in education. The small class size and the faculty's approach to education drew me to become a part of the Mac Family. The liberal arts college gives the student the ability to become a well-rounded individual which is needed when caring for the diverse population in the hospital and healthcare system."

  • Areas of interest: Bade enjoys traveling and recently had the opportunity to travel to Athens, Greece and Istanbul, Turkey. Her favorite place to travel is Wilmington, NC to visit her 18-month-old grandson. She also enjoys working in her flower garden during the spring.
  • M.S.N. — Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville
  • B.S.N. — Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville
  • A.D.N. — Lincoln Land Community College
  • Courses taught: Nursing 330, which included classroom, clinical simulation lab, and hospital clinical.
Photo of Barbara Chumley

Barbara Chumley

Assistant Professor of Nursing

"I love having the opportunity to teach in my hometown, my Alma Mater, and being a part of the whole Mac Fam experience!"

  • Areas of interest: Chumley loves being with her granddaughters. She loves to travel, go to car races, and quilt/embroider. Chumley also loves teaching nursing.
  • M.S. in Nursing Education — Western Governors University
  • B.S.N. — MacMurray College
  • Courses taught: Nursing Fundamental Skills, Nursing Health Assessment, Med-Surg Clinical Simulation Lab, Fundamental, Med-Surg, and Community Clinicals
Photo of Mary Dial

Mary Dial

Assistant Professor of Nursing

"I love teaching at MacMurray College because it is a small school in a small friendly community that contributes to the learning of the students. The MacMurray faculty and administration are very supportive and provide a wonderful environment for learning. Working at MacMurray College is more like spending time with family than going to a job. There is also an amazing coffee shop just a few blocks away."

  • Areas of interest: Dial enjoys many areas of nursing, but she has spent much time researching the special needs of patients of great size or BMI greater than 50. She feels that as this epidemic grows, nurses need to become knowledgeable in providing sensitive patient-specific care to this patient subgroup.
  • M.S. in Nursing Education — Benedictine University Lisle, Ill.
  • B.S.N. — Benedictine University Springfield, Ill.
  • A.D.N. — Lincoln Land Community College
  • Courses taught: Disease and Illness, Nursing 450 Leadership
Photo of Dr. Jill Parsons

Dr. Jill Parsons

Associate Professor of Nursing

"Teaching at MacMurray allows me to connect with the next generation of nurses as well as engage nurses looking to advance their careers by obtaining their BSN. Both faculty and students alike enjoy the small class sizes and the personalized attention."

  • Areas of interest: Dr. Parsons enjoys promoting active learning instructional strategies in the classroom.
  • Ph.D. — Saint Louis University
  • M.S.N. — Saint Francis Medical Center College of Nursing
  • B.S.N. — Saint Francis Medical Center College of Nursing
  • Courses taught: Introduction to the Nursing Profession, Pathophysiology and Pharmacology, Evidence Based Nursing Practice, Vulnerable Populations, Nursing Knowledge and Competencies, Health Assessment and Promotion Across the Lifespan, Evidence based Nursing Care
Photo of Sheila Rhodes

Sheila Rhodes

Assistant Professor of Nursing

"I love the nursing faculty teamwork and close-knit staff. President Tierno is down to earth and all staff have been friendly and helpful. I also enjoy the Ponderosa and ShopKo located here in Jacksonville."

  • Areas of interest: Rhodes is interested in women's health, including obstetrics, integrative health, and complementary medicine.
  • M.S. in Midwifery — University of Illinois-Chicago
  • B.S. in Nursing — Bradley University
  • Courses taught: Nursing 410, Nursing 415, Nursing 432, Clinical for Nursing 418, Clinical for Nursing 411

Sonia Williamson

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Photo of Betty Lowell Cottle, Ph.D. '45

Betty Lowell Cottle, Ph.D. '45
Chemistry Major
Retired Physician

"Graduating from MacMurray, which was unknown back east, and to be a female and to get into medical school was a real accomplishment."