The MacMurray College Deaf and Hard of Hearing Teacher Education Program is designed to provide you with all the preparation you need to become an effective teacher in public school districts, private schools, and state facilities.

As a major in MacMurray's Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education, you will get the opportunity to gain an understanding of the Deaf Community. Being immersed in Deaf Culture matters for becoming an exceptional teacher of the deaf. Many of the classes that students take are specific to challenges found within the deaf population.

In addition to classroom instruction, the program emphasizes experience working in area schools, including the Illinois School for the Deaf, located in Jacksonville.

You will have the chance to learn American Sign Language and Deaf Culture, with sufficient knowledge, skills, and abilities to interact with, provide services for, and develop programs and activities to Deaf and Hard of Hearing students at the elementary and secondary levels. Several of the American Sign Language instructors are deaf, so they provide special insight into Deaf Culture.

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing educator program at MacMurray is one of very few such programs in the United States. The Program will give candidates the opportunity to earn a Teacher Licensure for the State of Illinois in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education. Since Illinois has one of the more rigorous licensing requirements, the Illinois license transfers relatively easily to most other states.

At MacMurray, you gain experience through field work embedded in program courses. You will get numerous opportunities to observe and participate in classrooms in various school districts to develop the skills needed to be an effective teacher. The focus of a MacMurray education is a hands-on, experiential approach that matters for your preparation as an eductor: even before you begin your student teaching, you will have already been in a variety of schools 70-100 hours.

These teaching experiences will be at several school districts in the Jacksonville area, as well as the Illinois School for the Deaf in Jacksonville. You will also be given the opportunity to visit the Central Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis, as well as the chance to join and attend meetings of Illinois Teachers of the Hearing Impaired (ITHE) and the Council of Exceptional Children (CEC).

The need for educators of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing is nationwide, and candidates who have completed this program work in school districts and state schools across the United States.

"MacMurray College's Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education program prepared me to be confident and poised in the classroom. Being involved in the program also provided me with lifelong professional connections and support." -- Brianna Sevik '14, teacher at the Michigan School for the Deaf

Learn more about Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education courses and how to pursue a degree in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education through our academic catalog.

DHHE 201. Perspectives in Deafness: Foundations. (3) The audiological, psychological, and developmental aspects of varying degrees of hearing loss. Topics include audiology, anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism, historical and philosophical foundations of deaf education, educational placement options, varying communication modalities, assistive devices, and social cognitive aspects of deafness. No prerequisite.

DHHE 232. Guided Observation and Field Experiences with Deaf Students. (3) DHH majors will be placed in an educational setting where they will observe in an elementary or secondary program. Students who do not receive a grade of B or higher must repeat the course and cannot continue to take upper-level education courses until they do so. Prerequisites: ASLA 100 and 150, DHHE 201, and SPED 223.

DHHE 234. English and American Sign Language Phonetics. (3) Identification and transcription of the phonemes of English and American Sign Language (ASL) through use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, Thorndike Diacritical Markings, Northampton Spellings, and American Sign Language Alphabet (or ASL-phabet). Students will develop foundational knowledge of phonological decoding and how it contributes to best practices in reading instruction. They will describe how linguistic phonemes (regardless of modality) and related alphabetic knowledge lead to reading comprehension and fluency. Prerequisite: DHHE 201.

DHHE 240. Introduction to Audiology. (3) The study of principles of the hearing mechanism and conservation. Clinical practice in pure tone audiometry. Audiogram interpretation and hearing aid care. Prerequisites: DHHE 201.

DHHE 377. Introduction to Speech, Speechreading, and Auditory Training. (3) Relationship of amplified speech to receptive and expressive language; concepts and pedagogical practices in developing speech through auditory, visual, and tactile modalities; development of programs for maximum use of residual hearing in students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Prerequisites: DHHE 234 and 240.

DHHE 383. Teaching English as a Second and Low Access Language to Deaf Students (with Practicum). (3) Methods of teaching language to deaf students at different educational levels. Students will have the opportunity to apply theory and to practice techniques based on current trends and research. Guided observation and practicum. Prerequisite: senior standing in the division.

DHHE 384. Teaching Spoken Language to Deaf Students in Itinerant and Typical Classroom Settings with Guided Practicum. (3) Students will evaluate children's speech and language performance during in-class guided observations. On the basis of these evaluation outcomes, students will utilize guided observation data to plan effective lessons for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, including aspects of speech production (voice, articulation, rhythm, speechreading skills, and auditory development) as related to academic performance. Students will also learn the multiple roles and responsibilities of the itinerant teacher including but not limited to, family-centered service coordination, diagnostic test administration as it relates to IFSP/IEP development, conflict resolution and collaboration/conference techniques with school personnel and families. Prerequisites: DHHE 234 and 377 and acceptance as a DHH major in the Education Division.

DHHE 390. Integrating Effective Reading, Translation, and Academic Instructional Strategies for Deaf Students. (3) Methods and techniques of teaching reading, math, social studies, and science to students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Preparation, design, and analysis of materials for individualized and group instruction at the elementary and secondary levels. Students will achieve competency in methodology and techniques. Guided observation and practicum. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of program coordinator.

DHHE 494, 495. Clinical Practice: Elementary and Secondary. (7, 8) Clinical practice (student teaching) in classes for students who are deaf or hard of hearing in approved schools under qualified educators. Students who do not receive a grade of B or higher must repeat the course and cannot continue to take upper-level education courses until they do so. Prerequisites: senior standing, completion of all course and non-course requirements, and permission of instructor.

Photo of Dr. Donald Aubry

Dr. Donald Aubry

Associate Professor of Deaf & Hard of Hearing Education and Program Coordinator

"My kids are great!"

  • Areas of interest: Dr. Aubry enjoys studying Cognition, Language Development, and Student Development.
  • Ph.D. in Educational Administration — Southern Illinois University
  • Ed.S. in Educational Administration — Western Illinois University
  • M.S.E. in Educational Administration — Western Illinois University
  • B.S. in Deaf and Hard of Hearing — Northern Illinois University
  • Courses taught: Perspectives in Deafness: Foundations; Guided Observation and Field Experiences with Deaf Students; English and American Sign Language Phonetics; Introduction to Speech, Speechreading, and Auditory Training; Teaching English as a Second and Low Access Language to Deaf Students (with Practicum); Teaching Spoken Language to Deaf Students in Itinerant and Typical Classroom Settings with Guided Practicum; Integrate Effective Reading, Translation, and Academic Instructional Strategies for Deaf Students; Clinical Practice: Elementary and Secondary