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Business Administration

A degree in Business Administration leads to many career options, which may include retail, education, government, private, business, not-for-profit, consulting, or entrepreneurship. There are many opportunities with large corporations and also small or mid-size companies.

This online degree program in Business Administration will teach you the basics of the business world and an understanding of business functions that are applicable to any industry.

Our online degree program in Business Administration has a three-part focus.

  1. Foundational courses that will provide you with the communication and thinking skills necessary to face ethical and critical issues in a contemporary, global society.
  2. Core Business Administration courses to prepare you for any position within the many business professions.
  3. Specialized concentration courses give you extra expertise in your specific area of interest.

Program Learning Outcomes

Graduates will be able to

Available Concentrations

Those majoring in Business Administration will receive a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with concentrations available in the following areas.

Organizational Leadership

The Organizational Leadership program includes courses on managing change, organizational behavior, and management principles. Develop effective leadership skills for use in businesses, nonprofits, and government organizations.

Entrepreneurship

A study in Entrepreneurship shows you how to harness opportunities and build a successful business from the ground up. This online degree program trains you in sound business principles, preparing a business plan, and how to finance and manage a small business.

Human Resource Management

Human resources managers are needed in every industry. They plan, direct, and coordinate the administrative functions of an organization. They oversee the recruiting, interviewing, and hiring of new staff; consult with top executives on strategic planning; and serve as a link between an organization's management and its employees.

Supply Chain Management

Professionals in this field manage the entire life cycle of a product, which includes how a product is acquired, distributed, allocated, and delivered.

Management

A degree in Management can take you in any direction you choose. Managers plan, direct, and coordinate supportive services of an organization. Their specific responsibilities vary by the type of organization and may include keeping records, distributing mail, and planning and maintaining facilities.

Marketing

Marketers determine the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors and identify potential customers; develop pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the firm's profits or share of the market while ensuring the firm's customers are satisfied; and oversee product development or monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services.

Courses

Business Administration

(39 credit hours.)

BUS 127. Professional Communication in Organizations. (3) This course will cover written and oral communications in business organizations, with an emphasis on professional tone. Prerequisites: CMP 101 and CMP 102.

BUS 227. Globalization in the 21st Century. (3) This course examines the political, economic, and cultural aspects of contemporary trends of globalization.

BUS 237. Legal Issues and Policies. (3) This course focuses on the identification of potential legal concerns to organization leadership and management, particularly in the areas of common employment law issues, contract dispute resolution, regulatory compliance, and negligence.

BUS 242. Fundamentals of Microeconomics. (3) This course seeks to study how individuals and households as consumers and firms interact in the overall economy. Students will examine the basics of supply and demand, price formation, production decisions, welfare economics, taxation and other government policies, marginal cost and benefit, business competition, and public goods.

BUS 247. Fundamentals of Macroeconomics. (3) This course seeks to study the economy as a whole, dealing with economic data, behavior, and theory at the aggregate level of economics. Together we will examine income, employment, prices, and other variables in terms of their measurement, determination, and policy implications.

BUS 257. Fundamentals of Financial Accounting. (3) An introduction to double-entry accounting and the financial statement preparation process. Financial statement presentation and ratio analysis of the four basic financial statements will also be covered.

BUS 258. Accounting for Internal Decision-Makers. (3) A study of the managerial accounting concepts, calculations, and reports used by internal decision-makers in planning, operating, and controlling activities within an organization.

BUS 317. Marketing Fundamentals. (3) A study of marketing in the economy, the relationship between the consumer and marketer, determinants of market behavior, product pricing decisions, promotional strategies, and evaluation of marketing efforts.

BUS 327. Business Statistics. (3) Analysis of statistical theories and techniques and their applied use in professional settings. Prerequisite: MATH 107.

BUS 337. Ethics and Leadership. (3) This course will introduce students to the ethical dilemmas that face leaders and will prepare students to create and sustain themselves as ethical decision makers.

BUS 347. Operations and Production Management. (3) This course examines operations (the production function) as one of three primary functions of any organization: operations, marketing, and finance. It will explore how organizations make decisions pertaining to the areas of production process, quality control, production capacity, and inventory control.

BUS 357. Fiscal Resources. (3) This course introduces students to the language of finance and to financial issues that have impacts across organizations. The course covers financial statements, the evaluation and interpretation of financial statements, preparing master budgets and supporting budgets, and the application of incremental analysis to various organization decisions.

BUS 437. Business Practicum. (3) In this senior-level course, students will call upon theories and skills acquired in prior coursework to apply to a series of cases. Thoughtful selection, analysis and application of strategies are critical to success in the course.

Entrepreneurship

(18 credit hours.)

ENT 207. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. (3) This course is designed to provide an introduction to the process of turning an idea into a successful start-up business. A primary focus is for the student to explore the potential of being a successful entrepreneur. The course introduces the student to the processes for creating a potentially successful business plan. The student will use entrepreneurial discovery processes, assess opportunities for venture creation, and develop presentation skills to convince others of the potential success to implement the business entity.

ENT 317. Principles of Logistics. (3) This course provides an overview of how firms use distribution intermediaries to gain a competitive advantage in local and global markets through the integration of logistics and supply chain management. The management of the physical flow of products and information throughout the entire supply chain is examined, including physical distribution, transportation, warehousing, customer service, materials management, third-party and global logistics, systems planning, and operations and management of the supply chain.

ENT 337. Business Plan Development. (3) This course is for students interested in starting their own business or launching a new venture for a nonprofit or corporation. Students will learn the critical skill of writing an effective business plan, will learn the theory behind writing a business plan, and will apply what they learn to writing their own business plan.

ENT 347. Venture Capital and Banking. (3) This course explores the role of venture capitalists and investment banks in financing, advising, and influencing companies through the initial public offering; the structure of venture capital funds; staging of investments; compensation; valuation; and interactions between venture capital and economic activity, the legal environment, and social and ethical norms.

ENT 357. Digital Commerce and E-Business. (3) This course is a comprehensive survey of the principles, techniques, and implications of digital commerce and e-business. It covers the entire spectrum of Web-centric forms of communication and trade amongst commercial, industrial, institutional, governmental, employee and consumer participants, and partners. Important areas such as e-business models, security, privacy, and ethics are covered along with the major Internet tools and architecture behind digital commerce. Students use a web development tool to build and post a site and learn what an organization must do to effectively use e-commerce to achieve a competitive advantage.

ENT 367. Understanding Organizations. (3) This course explores structures, processes, and theories for understanding organizational performance.

Human Resource Management

(18 credit hours.)

HRM 307. Labor Relations. (3). The course will focus on labor relations in both the private and public sectors of the United States. The collective bargaining process will be examined and used in a variety of case studies.

HRM 327. People and Organizations. (3) This course examines practices and theories associated with managing human resources for effective organizations.

HRM 347. Employment Law. (3) A study of employment law in the United States with applications to individuals and businesses.

HRM 367. Understanding Organizations. (3) This course explores structures, processes, and theories for understanding organizational performance.

HRM 387. Training and Development. (3) The course studies the development and delivery of training and management development programs in a business setting.

HRM 407. Compensation and Benefits. (3). Basic principles of compensation and benefits, with particular emphasis on pay models and strategy.

Management

(18 credit hours.)

MNG 257. Principles of Leadership. (3) This course examines the foundational theories, development, and applications of effective leadership principles and skills.

MNG 307. Organizational Behavior. (3) The course will examine the field of organizational behavior. Topics covered include decision making, job design, motivation, burnout, and relationship dynamics of employees.

MNG 317. Management Information Systems. (3) An introduction to information management within the organization. Topics covered include types and uses of information systems, use of information by management, and information systems applications.

MNG 327. People and Organizations. (3) This course examines practices and theories associated with managing human resources for effective organizations.

MNG 347. Conflict and Negotiation. (3) This course explores ways of understanding the roots and dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution through a combination of theories, case studies, and hands-on experiences.

MNG 407. Total Quality Management. (3) This course explores Total Quality Management and the synergy required between functions to obtain the customer's quality demands. Students will understand statistical tools which are mandatory in any successful quality effort.

Marketing

(18 credit hours.)

MRK 327. Understanding the Consumer. (3) The course will apply the behavioral sciences to consumers' behavior in the marketplace.

MRK 337. Market Research. (3) Examines the systematic process used in marketing to gather and analyze data to aid in making marketing decisions.

MRK 347. Fundamentals of Graphic Design. (3). An introduction to the fundamental elements of graphic design with an emphasis on compositional and conceptual visual communication, typography, page layout design, graphic design and production software, and pre-press print production.

MRK 357. Marketing and Social Media. (3) This course provides an overview of techniques and strategies used in social media communications with an emphasis on online public relations and advertising.

MRK 367. Global Marketing. (3) The course will examine the global marketplace facing businesses today. Focus will be given to the challenges and opportunities in the marketplace for global companies.

MRK 387. Promotion and Public Relations. (3) The course will examine the promotional mix. Topics include advertising, sales promotion, and public relations.

Organizational Leadership

(18 credit hours.)

OLDR 257. Principles of Leadership. (3) This course examines the foundational theories, development, and applications of effective leadership principles and skills.

OLDR 267. Social Psychology. (3) This course examines human behavior in its social context to reveal how one's feelings and actions can be influenced by other people.

OLDR 327. People and Organizations. (3) This course examines practices and theories associated with managing human resources for effective organizations.

OLDR 337. Diversity and Organizations. (3) This course explores the dynamics of culture and diversity on organizations and personnel.

OLDR 347. Conflict and Negotiation. (3) This course explores ways of understanding the roots and dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution through a combination of theories, case studies, and hands-on experiences.

OLDR 367. Understanding Organizations. (3) This course explores structures, processes, and theories for understanding organizational performance.

Supply Chain Management

(18 credit hours.)

SCM 207. Supply Chain Management. (3) This course will expose students to topics related to design and management of supply chains, from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. Course topics will include supply chain network design, facility planning, capacity planning, globalization and outsourcing, information technology, and global issues in supply chain management.

SCM 317. Principles of Logistics. (3) This course provides an overview of how firms use distribution intermediaries to gain a competitive advantage in local and global markets through the integration of logistics and supply chain management. The management of the physical flow of products and information throughout the entire supply chain is examined, including physical distribution, transportation, warehousing, customer service, materials management, third-party and global logistics, systems planning, and operations and management of the supply chain.

SCM 327. Transportation Management. (3) This course will introduce students to the role and importance of transportation and to provide an overview of the operations of each mode of the transportation industry. Students will be introduced to the carrier cost structures of transportation providers (motor carriers, railroads, air carriers, intermodal and special carriers), operating characteristics, and public policy as it relates to transportation regulations. Practical aspects of transportation and distribution such as planning, routing, scheduling and loading cargo, and adhering to regulatory, safety, security and administrative requirements will be stressed.

SCM 347. International Supply Chain Management. (3) This course provides an overview of essential skills for managing supply chain logistics in an international business context. It covers practical applications of supply chain management including transportation modes; taxes, duties, and quotas; trade agreements; packaging requirements; use of intermediaries; documentation requirements; legal and regulatory requirements; insurance; trade conventions; and the offshore procurement process. Material is presented in the form of readings, e-lectures, practical applications, and self-assessments.

SCM 367. Decision Modeling and Analysis. (3) This course is an analytical approach to understanding the management process and solving management problems with emphasis on model formulation, solution techniques, and interpretation of results. Specific topics covered in this course include techniques such as linear, integer, goal- and multi-objective programming; queuing theory and applications; decision making under uncertainty and risk; decision trees; and multi-criteria decision making. Excel along with ASPE are the main analytical tools.

SCM 407. Total Quality Management. (3) This course explores Total Quality Management and the synergy required between functions to obtain the customer's quality demands. Students will understand statistical tools which are mandatory in any successful quality effort.