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Nursing

Faculty: J. Brannan (Director), J. Parsons, K. Ruppel, C. Staake, M. Anthony+.

MacMurray's program of study leading to a baccalaureate degree in nursing is approved by the Illinois Department of Professional and Financial Regulation and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), One Dupont Circle NW, Suite 530, Washington, D.C. 20036. Graduates of the program are prepared to take the national examination for licensure as a registered nurse (NCLEX-RN) and are prepared for ongoing graduate study for advanced nursing roles.

The Nursing Program was fully approved by the Committee of Nurse Examiners of the State of Illinois on August 3, 1979. The first class began later in August 1979. The first clinical courses were offered in the 1981-82 academic year, and the first students graduated in May 1983.

Mission

The MacMurray College Division of Nursing is among the few professional nursing education programs in central Illinois providing baccalaureate nursing education within a liberal arts institution. Students enter the program from diverse geographic and social backgrounds, bringing their unique contributions to the study of nursing.

The MacMurray College Nursing Program prepares graduates for professional nursing practice, graduate education, and ongoing career development within a nursing curriculum which is supported by an integrated liberal arts core. This integration promotes sound interpretation of new knowledge, clear articulation of thoughts, interdisciplinary connections, and discrimination in making judgments about factors that influence the human condition. Baccalaureate nursing education at MacMurray College prepares students to enter the nursing profession with the knowledge, values, and competencies necessary to provide, design, manage, and coordinate nursing care for diverse groups in a variety of settings. Consistent with the mission and goals of MacMurray College, the Division of Nursing stresses excellence in teaching, service, and scholarship among its faculty.

Graduates of the MacMurray Nursing Program will be competent professional nurses who are prepared to

  1. assume responsibility for supporting the profession by demonstrating concern for the welfare of others; engaging in self-reflection; maintaining lifelong learning; and engaging in moral, ethical, and legal behaviors;
  2. use clinical reasoning, intellectual curiosity, insight, and creativity in making and evaluating clinical judgments;
  3. communicate effectively with diverse groups using a variety of modes and strategies.
  4. use the nursing process in providing care to meet the health needs of individuals, families, and communities;
  5. design and manage healthcare in collaboration with other members of the healthcare team;
  6. discuss the implications of healthcare policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice in healthcare delivery;
  7. use technology to integrate information from a variety of sources;
  8. integrate evidence-based practice in designing and providing nursing care;
  9. integrate concepts from the liberal arts in planning, providing, and evaluating individualized, quality-focused nursing care.

Nursing Admission Process

All students begin application to the Nursing Program by applying to MacMurray College. Official copies of high school and college transcripts as well as test scores (ACT and/or SAT) should be forwarded from the appropriate institution. A student applying for advanced placement as a licensed practical nurse (LPN) or registered nurse (RN) must also provide a copy of current nursing licensure to the College Registrar and the Nursing Program. Certified nurse assistants (CNA) must provide a copy of current certification to the College Registrar and the Nursing Program to receive three hours of academic credit for their certification. Admission to the Nursing Program is on a space-available basis and specific deadlines are in place for freshman entry and transfer entry students.

Nursing Admission Requirements

Freshman Entry

Transfer Entry

Essential Performance Standards for Nursing

Applicants to the MacMurray College Nursing Program must possess sufficient physical, motor, intellectual, emotional, social, and communication skills necessary to safely and effectively care for their patients when providing direct or indirect care. The following list provides examples of activities nurses must regularly perform. This list is not all inclusive.

Mobility

Manual Dexterity

Sensory

Emotional Stability

Critical Thinking

Interpersonal/Communication Skills

Applicants or students who have difficulties with one or more of these skills should contact the Coordinator of Disability Support Services to determine whether reasonable accommodations can be made.

Placement Information

Students who are admitted to the Nursing Program as freshmen have a place secured in the appropriate nursing class provided they maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.50 and a grade of C or better in all prerequisite courses.

Transfer placement is on a space-available basis and based on evaluation of official transcripts by the Registrar and Division Chair of Nursing. Students who have taken previous nursing courses at another institutions but failed to complete the program of study are required to complete all MacMurray College nursing courses.

All natural science requirements in nursing must be completed by the end of the sophomore year in order to enter Nursing 310 and Nursing 330 the following fall.

LPNs receive up to 15 hours of academic credit for LPN licensure.

CNAs receive up to 3 hours of academic credit for certification.

RNs graduating from an approved ADN program are granted junior standing. Graduates of an approved diploma program are evaluated on an individual basis.

Advising

Nursing faculty serve as academic advisors to all nursing students.

Progression/Retention/Dismissal in the Nursing Program

Students are subject to the policies stated in the Division of Nursing Student Handbook. In summary, progression through the nursing program is sequential. Students who receive a D or F in either a nursing clinical or nursing theory course will not be allowed to progress until successful completion of the work in question. For all clinical courses, the clinical component is Pass/Fail. Failure in the clinical practicum will result in failure of the course.

To remain in the nursing program, students must meet the following criteria.

  1. Students must maintain an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above.
  2. Students must earn a grade of C or above in all required social and natural science courses and in all nursing courses.
  3. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or above in the general education courses.
  4. Nursing students may only repeat one nursing or nursing support course and a student who receives an unsatisfactory grade in a nursing or nursing support course may only repeat that course once. Withdrawal from a nursing or nursing support course with a WF or a clinical evaluation of "Unsatisfactory" will be counted as a repeated course. (This policy goes into effect for all Nursing students in the Fall semester 2011. However, it will not apply retroactively to students who met the previous standards.)
  5. Students with GPAs below 2.50 for two semesters or more during their nursing education will be dismissed from the program. The semesters do not have to be sequential.
  6. Previous students who have withdrawn in good standing but not been enrolled for more than two years must petition the Division of Nursing to re-enter the Nursing Program. Nursing coursework completed more than two years prior to readmission will be reviewed on a course-by-course basis and students may be required to take proficiency exams and/or retake selected courses.
  7. Students may be dismissed for unsafe clinical practice or unprofessional behavior, regardless of the student's academic standing.
  8. Senior students must achieve a department-designated score on a standardized exit exam and, if needed, complete remediation before they are approved by the division chair to take the NCLEX-RN.

Program of Study

Nursing majors are required to complete all components of the College's general education program. In addition, the following nursing support courses are required.

Electives: The minimum hours required for graduation are 120. The number of elective hours will vary with the individual's program options. Minors in Psychology and Spanish are available for qualified students.

Other Requirements

Clinical practica take place in community and regional health institutions. Transportation to and from the practicum sites is the responsibility of the student. Additional requirements include, but are not necessarily limited to, the maintenance of liability insurance and Healthcare Provider CPR certification (adult, infant, and child, AED), criminal background checks, drug screenings, purchase of uniforms and lab supplies, and compliance with departmental health regulations as stated below. Liability insurance, lab supplies, and uniforms are purchased through a student lab fee. Clinical agencies may also require further criminal background checks and drug testing. Background check and drug screenings must be completed through a provider approved by the Division of Nursing.

Health requirements are as follows:

  1. proof of recent physical examination;
  2. proof of immunity to rubeola (measles) and rubella (German measles);
  3. proof of immunity against hepatitis B virus;
  4. results from a two-step TB skin test (renewed annually).

Documentation of compliance with all clinical practicum requirements must be provided to the Division of Nursing before the first nursing course. Renewal of annual requirements must be completed before the beginning of each subsequent fall semester.

Clinical Experiences

Hospitals and community health care agencies provide learning sites for clinical practicums. Hospitals providing experiences for students are Passavant Area Hospital in Jacksonville and Memorial Medical Center and St. John's Hospital in Springfield. Experiences in community agencies include county health departments, home health care agencies, nursing homes, community health clinics, and alcohol and substance abuse treatment centers.

Courses

NURS 205. Introduction to the Nursing Profession. (1) This course introduces students to their privileged roles as members of the nursing profession. Exploration of critical thinking and clinical judgment processes is used to promote self-awareness and facilitate nursing role development. The course incorporates assessment of learning styles as a means to facilitate learner outcomes. Students are exposed to the standards of the profession including its values, ethical principles, and legal responsibilities. Students examine the relationships between personal and professional values, exploring their own assumptions and approaches to judging situations. No clinical. Prerequisite: admission to the Nursing Program and completion of at least 24 credit hours of nursing prerequisite courses and/or general education requirements, including Biology 209: Microbiology.

NURS 210. Nursing Knowledge and Competencies I. (4) Introduces students to the fundamental nursing knowledge and competencies necessary to practice nursing. Competencies addressed will include fundamental aspects of caring, communication, the nursing process, and technical nursing skills. This course will integrate the knowledge of critical thinking, clinical judgment, and standards of the nursing profession (values, ethics, legal responsibilities) introduced in Nursing 105. Lab course. Prerequisites: admission to the Nursing Program and completion of at least 24 credit hours of nursing prerequisite courses and/or general education requirements, including Biology 209: Microbiology.

NURS 211. Nursing Knowledge and Competencies II. (5) This course continues to build on the knowledge and competencies learned in Nursing 210, with increasing opportunities to transfer classroom knowledge to the clinical setting. Students learn the scientific principles underlying technical nursing skills which include medication administration, medical and surgical asepsis, wound care, cardiopulmonary interventions, gastrointestinal functioning, genitourinary functioning, pre- and post-operative care, and end-of-life care. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide the opportunity to apply the psychomotor aspects of these skills. Students function as providers of care in adult health care settings. Clinical course. Prerequisites: Nursing 210 and Biology 209 and 320.

NURS 214. Health Assessment. (3) Introduces students to the holistic assessment of an individual. In this course, students learn normal assessment findings expected for individuals across the lifespan. This provides a basis for recognizing findings that require additional assessment and monitoring. Students are introduced to physical and psychosocial assessment skills as well as the major influences of development, environment, culture, religion, socioeconomic status, and family. Emphasis is placed on the importance of assessment as the first step of the nursing process. Lab course. Prerequisites: Nursing 210 and Biology 209 and 320 or permission of instructor.

NURS 310. Pathophysiology and Pharmacology I. (3) Provides the core knowledge necessary to understand the physiological and pharmacological aspects of illness and disease. Addresses the scientific principles and rationales necessary to recognize the relationships between pathology, pharmacology, and nursing care. No clinical. Prerequisites: Nursing 211 and 214 and all natural science requirements.

NURS 311. Pathophysiology and Pharmacology II. (3) Provides the core knowledge necessary to understand the physiological and pharmacological aspects of illness and disease. Addresses the scientific principles and rationales necessary to recognize the relationships between pathology, pharmacology, and nursing care. No clinical. Prerequisites: Nursing 310 and 330.

NURS 330. Illness and Disease Management I. (6) Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to design and provide care for adults with illness and disease. Students focus on providing individualized, evidence-based nursing care directed toward achieving quality outcomes. Clinical experiences take place in acute care settings. Clinical course. Prerequisites: Nursing 211 and 214 and all natural science requirements.

NURS 331. Illness and Disease Management II. (6) Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to design and provide nursing care for adults with complex illness and disease. Students focus on providing individualized, evidence-based nursing care directed toward achieving quality outcomes. Clinical experiences take place in rapidly changing acute-care settings. Students engage in reflection on their clinical reasoning skills and clinical judgments. Clinical course. Prerequisites: Nursing 310 and 330.

NURS 401. Evidence-based Nursing Practice. (3) Emphasizes the utilization of current research findings as a means to improve nursing outcomes. Theoretical foundations of the research process are explored. Beginning skills are developed in critiquing nursing research and conducting research reviews. The use of information technology as a tool for finding and disseminating evidence for nursing practice is explored. No clinical. Prerequisites: senior standing, Statistics.

NURS 410. Vulnerable Populations I. (4) Emphasizes public health principles with childbearing/childrearing families and communities. Clinical experiences provide students with the opportunity to design, manage, and coordinate nursing care for families and vulnerable populations. Students will focus on using evidence-based nursing care to achieve health outcomes for populations. Clinical course. Prerequisites: senior standing and Psychology 242.

NURS 411. Vulnerable Populations II. (3) Focuses on the elderly population's self-management of common chronic illnesses and the associated goal of independent living. Students are required to reflect on their own beliefs regarding the elderly population, explore current evidence-based practice regarding self-management of chronic illness in the elderly, and develop a management plan for clients in an independent-living facility. Clinical experiences involve home visits to elderly clients living with chronic illnesses in the community. Clinical course. Prerequisite: senior standing.

NURS 415. Illness and Disease Management in Childbearing and Childrearing Families. (4) Focuses on core knowledge and core competencies necessary to coordinate and manage nursing care for pregnant women with complications and children experiencing illness and disease. Collaboration with others is emphasized to achieve quality outcomes. Clinical course. Prerequisite: senior standing.

NURS 418. Mental Illness and Disease Management. (5) This course focuses on illness and disease management for persons with mental health and psychiatric disorders. It is designed to provide a holistic perspective in the provision of care to individuals, families, and communities. Clinical experiences provide students with the opportunity to design, manage, and coordinate nursing care for individuals and families with mental health needs. Students will focus on using evidence-based nursing care to achieve health outcomes for clients. Clinical course. Prerequisite: senior standing.

NURS 432. Nursing Synthesis. (2) This course involves reflection on and synthesis of the student's learning achievements throughout their nursing education. Students reflect on achievement of the nursing program outcomes and synthesize their achievements using a portfolio. In addition, students engage in weekly NCLEX-RN review sessions in order to prepare for the NCLEX-RN. Prerequisite: senior-level nursing students.

NURS 450. Leadership and Professionalism in Nursing. (6) A wide variety of trends, concepts, and issues that are central to the profession of nursing are discussed. The transition from novice to competent professional nurse is addressed with emphasis on lifelong professional growth. Organizational, leadership, and management principles and theories are explored as students coordinate, delegate, and supervise care for teams of patients. Methods of evaluating the quality and effectiveness of nursing care are addressed. Three class hours and nine clinical hours per week. Prerequisite: senior standing. Offered in the last semester of the senior year.