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Business — Accounting — Sport Management

Faculty: T. Creal*, C. Douglas*, K. Langhoff*, S. Oberg, K. White.

The Business faculty offer programs and courses designed to meet the educational needs of students planning careers in Accounting, Business Administration, and Sport Management, as well as the general informational needs of those individuals seeking a better understanding of the nature and operation of the economy, business, and sports. Successful completion of one of the major programs will provide the foundation necessary for a professional career or graduate study. Students may pursue either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science. A major in Accounting or Business Administration requires the completion of prescribed courses in accounting, business administration, economics, finance, management, and marketing. A major in Sport Management requires the completion of prescribed courses in accounting, biology, economics, management, physical education, sport management, and psychology.

Career Experience

The Career Experience option is encouraged for juniors and seniors concentrating in all areas of Accounting, Business Administration, and Sport Management. Career Experience provides exposure to and experience in the professional worlds of business, charitable organizations, sports, and government.

Faculty members in Business, working with the Director of Career Services, assist students in obtaining Career Experience positions and oversee the supervision of the students during the experience. The positions vary from a few hours per week to full time. Positions have been held in professional sport organizations, government agencies, charitable organizations, financial institutions, businesses, and accounting firms. Some are in the Jacksonville area and some are near the students' homes or in other metropolitan areas.

Accounting

Major

Accounting majors are required to successfully complete a common group of business core courses: Accounting 221 and 222; Business Administration 223, 301, 316, 367, and 400; Economics 210 and 220; Finance 345; Management 317; and Marketing 330. In addition, the major in Accounting also requires Accounting 344, 350, 351, 352, 353, and 354.

Minor

For those students majoring in an area other than Accounting but interested in gaining a better understanding of the field, the program offers a minor in Accounting. This minor requires successful completion of the following courses: Accounting 221, 222, 351 and 352; Economics 210 or 220; Finance 345; and one additional 300-level Accounting course.

Business Administration

Major

Business Administration majors are required to successfully complete a common group of business core courses: Accounting 221 and 222; Business Administration 223, 301, 316, 367, and 400; Economics 210 and 220; Finance 345; Management 317; and Marketing 330. In addition, the major in Business Administration also requires that students complete four 300-level courses from the following areas: Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, or Marketing.

Minor

For those students majoring in an area other than Accounting or Business Administration but interested in gaining a better understanding of business, the program offers a minor in Business Administration. This minor requires successful completion of the following courses: Accounting 221 and 222; Economics 210 and 220; Finance 345; Management 317; and Marketing 330.

Coaching

Minor

For those students majoring in an area other than Sport Management but interested in gaining a better understanding of coaching, the program offers a minor in Coaching. This minor requires successful completion of the following courses: Biology 105 or 110 and 320; Physical Education 101 or 103, 382, and 408 or 409; and Sport Management 340.

Finance

Minor

For those students interested in gaining a better understanding of finance, the program offers a minor in Finance. This minor requires successful completion of the following courses: Accounting 221 and 222; Economics 210 or 221 and 305; and Finance 345, 346, and 358.

Management

Minor

For those students interested in gaining a better understanding of management, the program offers a minor in Management. This minor requires successful completion of the following courses: Business Administration 223 and 316; Economics 220; and Management 317, 320, 325, and 399.

Marketing

Minor

For those students interested in gaining a better understanding of marketing, the program offers a minor in Marketing. This minor requires successful completion of the following courses: Economics 220 and Marketing 330, 335, 337, 345, and 399.

Sport Management

Major

Sport Management majors are required to successfully complete these core courses: Sport Management 101, 102, 231, 360, 370, 372; Accounting 221 and 222; Biology 110; Business Administration 223; Economics 210 or 220; Management 317; Physical Education 101 and 103; and Psychology 201.

Minor

For those students majoring in an area other than Sport Management but interested in gaining a better understanding of sport management, the program offers a minor in Sport Management. This minor requires successful completion of the following courses: Sport Management 101, 231, 263, 360, 370, and 372.

Courses

Accounting

ACCT 221. Principles of Financial Accounting. (3) Introduction to the recording of financial data and reporting of information in financial statements. Recording of transactions and presentation and analysis of the resulting information in the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. No prerequisite.

ACCT 222. Principles of Managerial Accounting. (3) Introduction to the recording and reporting of information to management. Recording, reporting, and analysis of the costs of doing business and the budgeting and financing of those costs. Prerequisite: Accounting 221.

ACCT 344. Federal Income Taxes. (3) A study of federal income tax principles and laws with applications to individuals and businesses. Prerequisite: Accounting 222.

ACCT 350. Cost Accounting. (3) A study of cost accounting, including accumulation and measurement, using job order, process, and standard cost systems. Cost-volume-profit relationships and the use of analysis in managerial planning and control. Prerequisite: Accounting 222.

ACCT 351. Intermediate Financial Accounting I. (3) A study of financial accounting by corporations. This first course of the two-semester sequence includes understanding of financial accounting concepts and applying those concepts to assets and current liabilities. Prerequisite: Accounting 222.

ACCT 352. Intermediate Financial Accounting II. (3) A study of financial accounting by corporations. This second course of the two-semester sequence includes applying financial accounting concepts to long-term liabilities and stockholders equity as well as accounting for leases, income taxes, post-retirement benefits, and earning per share. Prerequisite: Accounting 351.

ACCT 353. Advanced Financial Accounting. (3) A study of financial accounting for special topics, including business combinations, consolidations, governmental reporting, not-for-profit reporting, international reporting, and recent pronouncements. Prerequisite: Accounting 352.

ACCT 354. Auditing. (3) A study of the auditing standards and their application in the accounting profession. Prerequisites: Accounting 352 and Business Administration 367.

Business Administration

BUSA 223. Business Communication. (3) This course explores the theory and practice of a variety of business communication situations including group communication, interviewing, resume writing, business presentations, and others. Prerequisites: Rhetoric 102 and 103 or permission of instructor.

BUSA 301. Cultural Environment of International Business. (3) The impact of cultural differences and diverse world views on the practice of business in multicultural and international business environments. Students will examine the nature of culture and their own cultural perspectives in relation to a variety of business contexts. No prerequisite.

BUSA 316. Business Law. (3) A study of the field of law as it applies to business transactions, including commercial code, torts, agency and employment negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, and security. No prerequisite.

BUSA 367. Statistics for the Social Sciences. (3) Analysis of statistical theories and techniques and their applications for decision making in the social sciences. No prerequisite.

BUSA 400. Business Strategy. (3) An integration and application of previous courses through the study of problems in policy formulation and implementation. The cases and topics discussed in the course will place emphasis on strategic planning. Open only to seniors majoring in Business.

Economics

ECON 210. Principles of Macroeconomics. (3) Studies the economy as a whole dealing with economic data, behavior, and theory at the aggregate level of the economy. Examines income, employment, prices, and other variables in terms of their measurement, determination, and policy implications. No prerequisite.

ECON 220. Principles of Microeconomics. (3) Studies demand, supply, price formation, and production decisions. Examines the individual and interrelated behavior of consumers, firms, and industries. No prerequisite.

ECON 305. Money and Banking. (3) Basic principles of banking, monetary, and international financial systems, with particular emphasis on monetary theory and policy. Prerequisite: Economics 210.

Finance

FINC 199. Personal Finance. (3) How to survive financially and obtain the maximum benefit from your income. The course will lead students to create a short and long term financial plan for living within a budget and anticipating retirement. It will review basics on managing money and credit; interest rates; personal loans; investing; home purchasing and financing; and obtaining the right insurance for auto, home, life, and health. No prerequisite.

FINC 345. Business Finance. (3) Fundamental theories and principles of finance common to all legal forms of business organizations, with emphasis on financial policies of the corporate enterprise. Topics include financial analysis, measurement of risk and return, capital budgeting, cost of capital, working capital management, leverage, and capital structure optimization. Prerequisite: Accounting 221.

FINC 346. Investments. (3) An introduction to the securities market. An examination of the major financial instruments and the markets in which they are bought and sold. Emphasis upon formulation of investment policy by both the individual and the business organization. Prerequisite: Finance 345.

FINC 358. Intermediate Financial Management. (3) Selected topics in managing the investment, financing, and working capital activities of a business. The course also provides in-depth analysis of financial statements and case studies which cover a wide range of financial problems. Prerequisites: Business Administration 367 and Finance 345. Business Administration 367 may be taken concurrently.

FINC 399. Topics in Finance. (3) An examination of selected topics in finance. Topics include international finance, international trade, international economics, capital budgeting, international financial management, or portfolio management. Prerequisite: Finance 345.

Management

MGMT 317. Principles of Management. (3) Policies, decision making, objectives, functions, form of organization, facilities, and techniques as they are applied in successful business management.

MGMT 320. Human Resource Management. (3) The personnel and status relationships existing in a typical firm. Topics covered include selection and staffing, placement, training and development, performance evaluation, compensation and benefits, and labor relations. Prerequisite: Management 317.

MGMT 325. Leadership Styles in Business. (3) The styles of leadership in the world of business. Topics covered include leadership theories, development of leadership and decision making skills, and gender differences in leadership. Prerequisite: Management 317.

MGMT 340. Management and Business Ethics. (3) After a brief survey of classic moral argument and method, an analysis of the nature and justification of standards of professional conduct and particular moral issues related to business and management will be discussed. (Cross-listed with PHIL 226)

MGMT 399. Topics in Management. (3) An examination of selected topics in management. Topics include business organizations, international management, and history of management. Prerequisite: Management 317.

Marketing

MARK 330. Principles of Marketing. (3) Marketing in the economy, nature and scope of marketing, the consumer and marketing, determinants of buyer behavior, the product, the price system, distribution structure, promotional activities, and evaluation of the marketing effort. No prerequisite.

MARK 335. Marketing Research. (3) Studies the systematic and objective process of gathering, recording, and analyzing data to aid in making marketing decisions. Prerequisites: Business Administration 367 and Marketing 330.

MARK 337. Consumer Behavior. (3) Studies in the application of the behavioral sciences to understand human behavior in the market place. Prerequisite: Marketing 330.

MARK 345. Advertising. (3) Principles and techniques of advertising. Specific topics include planning and execution of advertising campaigns, the social and economic role of advertising, the creative process, and customer research. Prerequisite: Marketing 330 or Sport Management 231.

MARK 399. Topics in Marketing. (3) An examination of selected topics in the field of marketing. Topics include consumer behavior, international marketing, and marketing management. Prerequisite: Marketing 330.

Sport Management

SPRT 101. Introduction to Sport Management. (3) An introduction to general management theory and principles with direct application to the Sport Management field. A case study approach will be used to integrate theory and practical application addressing the three primary segments — consumer, spectator, and participant. No prerequisite.

SPRT 102. Sociology of North American Sport. (3) Deals with issues such as corporate sport; big time college sport; and sexism, racism, drugs, and violence in sport. Examines how society is influenced by sport and how sport is influenced by society. No prerequisite.

SPRT 231. Sport Marketing. (3) The principles and techniques of sports marketing. Major thrust of course will focus on the establishment of a corporate program and the growing use of sports marketing by business. Prerequisites: Sport Management 101 and 102 and Rhetoric 103.

SPRT 255. Fitness and Health Concepts. (3) This course covers topics such as the importance of warming up and how dynamic and static stretching both have benefits and limitations. It teaches a variety of stretches of different disciplines and shows how flexibility aids in athletic performance. Strength training using free weights, machines and body weight will also be explored. Additional topics such as nutrition, supplements, and sport specific training will also be covered.

SPRT 263. Intramural and Recreation Administration. (3) Organizational patterns, issues, management, financing, and planning intramural and recreation programs. Prerequisite: Sport Management 101.

SPRT 275. Field Practicum. (3) Observation, participation, and/or in-service training in the sport management field. A faculty member will supervise the student's practical experience, supplementary reading, and written work. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, Sport Management 101 and 102, and permission of faculty supervisor.

SPRT 340. Theory of Coaching. (3) This course provides the foundation for those who coach sports at any level. Emphasis will be placed on the difference in levels of competitive sports, the personal roles coaches should exhibit, the professional roles expected, and the organizational influences on the world of coaching. No prerequisite. Same as Physical Education 340. Prerequisites: Sport Management 101 and 102.

SPRT 360. Facility and Event Management. (3) A review, analysis, and critical study of the principles, terminology and standards for planning, construction, use, and maintenance of facilities for programs in sport management and physical education-related disciplines. Prerequisites: Sport Management 101 and 102 and Accounting 221 and 222.

SPRT 370. Public Relations for Sport Organizations. (3) A comprehensive study of the principles, problems, and promotions for planning and implementing public relations programs in sport organizations. Prerequisite: Sport Management 231.

SPRT 372. Legal Issues of Sports and Recreation. (3) The study of the application of various legal doctrines to a broad range of sports-related activities. It will include a focus on some of the legal issues which arise in sport business as well as discussion of some of those which occur in professional sports arenas. Prerequisites: junior standing and Sport Management 360.

SPRT 375. Field Practicum. (3) Observation, participation, and/or in-service training with an entity in the sport management field. A faculty member and an entity employee cooperatively supervise the student's practical experience, supplementary reading, and written work. Prerequisite: Sport Management 275 and permission of faculty supervisor.